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MCC outlaws the use of saliva to shine  ball, and ‘Mankad’ is no longer considered an unfair game

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The use of saliva to shine the ball has been outlawed by the Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), although the seldom-used but perfectly legal “Mankad” method of dismissing batsmen will not be placed under unfair play.

Cricketers, they claim, have employed the age-old technique of dazzling one side of the ball with saliva and perspiration to aid bowlers in creating more movement in the air as the ball goes towards batters.

The new regulations make the restriction on putting saliva to the ball, which was introduced in July 2020 when men’s cricket restarted after a Covid-19 suspension, permanent.

According to their findings, the prohibition had little or no effect on the number of swing bowlers were getting during this time period. Sweat will still be allowed to polish the ball.

“The revised regulations will not allow the use of saliva on the ball,” the MCC said in a statement. “This also removes any grey areas of fielders ingesting sugary treats to modify their saliva to apply to the ball.”

“Using saliva will be considered the same as any other unethical approach of altering the ball’s condition.”

The revisions will take effect on October 1st, according to the MCC, which has been the ultimate authority on cricket legislation since its founding in 1787.

When a non-striker moves out of the crease, a bowler might choose to whip off the bails rather than finish his delivery to the hitter on strike, resulting in a “Mankad” dismissal.

While lawful, the dismissal was deemed against the spirit of the game since it was called after India spinner Vinoo Mankad, who ran out Australia’s Bill Brown in a similar manner in 1947.

 

The MCC stated that, while the text of the legislation would stay the same, it will be renamed Law 38 (Unfair Play) instead of Law 41 (Unfair Play) (Run out).

In other adjustments, the MCC said that if a batter is out caught, the new player would come in at the end where the striker was and face the next ball unless the over is over.

 

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