Philadelphia police opened fire on a 27-year-old man, Walter Wallace on Philadelphia Street Monday afternoon after shouting at him to throw a knife at an incident.

The shooting took place around 4 p.m. While officers were calling for a gun report, police spokeswoman Tanya Little said. Little said officers were called to the Cobs Creek district to meet a man later identified as Walter Wallace who had a knife.

The officers ordered Wallace to drop the knife, but he “went ahead” of them instead. Both officers “fired several times,” Little said.

Wallace was hit in the shoulder and chest. One of the officers then put him in a police car and took him to a hospital, where he died shortly afterwards.

A video of a random confrontation recorded by a random person posted on social media shows police pointing guns at Wallace as he walked down the street around a car. He was walking towards the officers when they were retreating from him in the street, the weapons were still aimed at him. They shout at him to drop the knife.

Both then fired several shots, and Wallace collapsed on the street. A woman screams and runs towards him. After that, several passers-by approach him.

It is unclear in the video whether he had a knife. Witnesses said he caught one.

Civil Rights Defender Ben Crump, who represents the Floyd family Floyd, tweeted the video late Monday night. Floyd’s death while in police custody prompted repeated calls for racial justice to end police brutality.

“Philadelphia police shot dead Walter Wallace Jr. 10 times today, shooting him 10 times while he was standing at least 10 meters away,” Trump wrote in tweets. “He allegedly had a knife, but the police tried NO to defuse the situation in this video. “They went straight to kill Wallace in front of his loved ones.”

The names of the officers who fired the shots are not immediately reported. Both were carrying body cameras and were removed from the street duty before the examination.

A large crowd had gathered at the scene of the murder. The video shows many people shouting at police officers and crying. Some people later spoke to Daniel Outlav, the police commissioner, who arrived at the scene shortly after the shooting. The crowd mostly dispersed after about two hours.

“I have heard and felt the outrage of the community,” Outlaw said in a statement, adding that the video “raises many questions” and that “those questions will be fully resolved by the investigation.”

Wallace’s father, Walter Wallace Sr., told the Philadelphia Inquirer that his son was also a father, taking medication and struggling with mental health issues.

“Why didn’t they use a taster?” He asked.

Police races were not immediately confirmed. The shooting took place in a predominantly black neighborhood in western Philadelphia. The Inquirer reported that dozens of protesters had gathered near a nearby park, chanting “Loves are possible.”