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Singer, Major Van Winkle Has Passed Away

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Major Van Winkle  Death – Dead: Philadelphia songwriter, producer and singer Major Van Winkle is dead. Don Van Winke aka Major Van Winke who is the son of a well known Philadelphia guitarist sadly passed away today September 16 2020. His cause of death or what led to his shocking demise is not yet known to us at the time of filing this report. He died at the age of 26.

His death was confirmed by Rachel Edger in an official Facebook. Paying her tribute to the super talented singer, Rachel wrote – Major Van Winkle Rest In Peace you were incredibly talented and the world will miss you. Your music is inspirational and you will live on through it forever. I hope you’ve found your forever peace watch over the world man god knows we need it.

Major Van Winkle has worked on numerous projects. In 2018 he released the Philadelphia Eagles football Rap song. In 2016 he released his hit track “Back Home” which gained lots of attention. A few months ago Van Winkle released a new studio project, “Selfish Presley” album. The album housed his latest new hit track “Born Again Mistake“. Major Van Winkle has been very active in the music industry for more than seven years.

Major Van Winkle & Dad

Major Van Winkle has also shared the stage with his dad, Don Lee Van. He has performed alongside his father on many occasions. There recent and last performance was at Franky Bradley’s in centre city Philly.

Major Van Winke & Dad, Don Lee Van

His dad is a true rock & roller. This past summer, he released his third studio album that Major Van helped him write and collaborate with. The live release party was an amazing showcase of love, soul, friendship and music coming from a genuine place.

The Hooters Reacts

The Hooters band has also reacted to the death of Major Van Winkle. In their official Facebook page, they posted – Our hearts are broken with the sudden passing of Major Van Winkle, son of Don Lee Van Winkle and the late Kathy McDonnell. We mourn this unimaginable loss from such a loving, generous, and musically creative family. Please keep them all in your thoughts and prayers. Major’s powerful voice and charismatic presence will echo on in the garden of our dreams.

Tributes Floods Social Media

Neal Walsh wrote

WIPMorningShow, So very sad to hear the news of Major Van Winkle passing away Disappointed face That young man had such a talent and I always enjoyed listening to his musical creations!! Rest in Peace and prayers for your family and friends.

Jamey wrote

RIP Major Van Winkle I’ll miss your rhymes on WIP your energy was contagious.

Jose Gonzalez wrote

Really saddened by this news. dam bro, you were one of a kind sorry we failed you.

Fern Brodkin wrote

So sorry to hear about the passing of Major Van Winkle. Love and condolences to Don van Winkle, family and friends.

Caroline King made a very lengthy post about the sudden demise of the superstar, describing all she knows about Van Winkle. Read Below:-

This remembrance is personal, vulnerable, intimate, and therefore scary. But that’s who he was in the world, and that’s what he brought out in me, so I suppose that’s appropriate.

I don’t really know how to write about the passing of someone like Major Van Winkle because he’s not the sort of person you can imagine not being alive. He’s not really the sort of person that…anything. There is no “sort of person” like Major, he’s the only person like him I’ve ever known. He was more alive than anyone I’ve ever encountered, and being around him made me feel alive in ways that only someone who is that unselfconscious and present could make you feel. It’s actually only possible to talk about Major in superlatives and hyperbole because it’s the only thing that comes close to capturing what it was like to be in his orbit.

Our families have been close since long before either of us were born, but he and I became friends only in our adult lives. Our relationship was also sporadically romantic, in a way that felt like we were just comets that occasionally crashed into each other and then rocketed back into our separate universes. This kind of grandiose, celestial imagery is, again, the only kind of language that really captures what he felt like. He was a supernova of a person, and he made me want to be that too.

We didn’t get to see each other often, maybe once or twice a year. And every time we did it was like we briefly exited the real world and stepped into an alternate reality where time stopped and all that existed was love and excitement and connection.

And then we’d part ways and go back to looking forward to the next cosmic collision, whenever that would be. And I would often marvel at how confusing it was that I thought about him as much as I did considering how little we actually saw each other. But I think he loomed that large in my head and heart because he made me feel like I could tap into parts of myself that I felt too scared, too self-conscious, too small to explore. But the more I got to know him, the more I got to know myself. And that’s the real magic of people like Major — he’s a firework in a way that ignites you too.

No one’s death is easy to process, but it is a special kind of scary and destabilizing to lose someone so electric. To see the infinite made finite all of a sudden and with no warning. And it’s also difficult to know how to celebrate someone’s intensity of living and feeling and being when that intensity also may have played a role in magnifying their suffering and making it hard to see outside of it. It’s all agony. But Major and I talked a lot about the dance between agony and beauty, how much magic there is in feeling intensely and viscerally, and how much humanity there is to be found in the vulnerable expression of what you feel. That was his gift, this sweet beautiful boy, to make you feel.

And so while I can’t believe I’ll never get to see him again, and I know that so many who were in his orbit are reeling in the same way, I think there are things about myself and about the world that are only visible to me because I knew him. He was a human sparkler and I love love love him for it.

Few Things You Need To Know About Major Van Winkle

Don Van Winkle better known by his stage name as Major Van Winkle was a talented singer who spent his childhood growing up in a musical South Philly home.

He is the grandson of Maje McDonnell, a 1950’s Phillies pitching coach.

From falling asleep in his crib to Mozart-baby cassettes to learning how to play the theme from Jaws on the family piano, Major became obsessed with music. Major grew up constantly listening to his parents’ eclectic collection of classic Rock n’ Roll, R&B and Soul records. On weekends, Major had the unique opportunity to see his father perform at live gigs, as well as watch his Uncle’s band, Philly’s own Soul Survivors, perform.

Major adored the classic, soulful, oldies sounds that made up his first exposure to music. Due to these influences, Major started playing the drums as his first musical expression.

In his pre-teen years, Major discovered a subset of music called ‘Hip Hop’. At first, the genre was foreign to him, but something kept intriguing him about this mode of music as he began to mentally blend it with the classic sounds he grew up with.

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