The Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon  on Thursday said she is willing to ease covid-19 lockdown in Scotland.

The minister published a blueprint on setting out how to lift or ease lockdown in the northern part of the country as she disclosed that there should be a balance towards tackling the virus and protecting the country’s economy.

Nicola revealed that she is on the way to create a mature discussion with the members of the public on the better way to restore normalcy into the lives of the people as she set out some numbers of restrictions which could be possibly be lifted soonest.

Her plans on re-opening and easing lockdown includes allowing certain business to open on the ground they can guarantee social distancing and looking at possibility of allowing schools to open. to this she said will require a redesign system of classrooms that can maintain a two metres away from each other.

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However, she said large gatherings are unlikely to be allowed ‘for some months to come’ while the shielding of the vulnerable will also have to continue for the foreseeable future. She also insisted any easing of restrictions is not yet imminent.

It comes after Arlene Foster suggested Northern Ireland could emerge from coronavirus restrictions at a faster pace than other parts of the UK.

Northern Ireland’s First Minister said lockdown measures will be eased when certain scientific and public health criteria – such as the rate of infection and death rate – are met and not against set timelines or dates.

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The developments pile the pressure on Downing Street to set out its own end-of-lockdown plan.

Many of the powers relating to the current lockdown are devolved which means Scotland and Northern Ireland could in theory opt to do their own thing, potentially leaving England and Wales behind.

So far the four Home Nations have been broadly on the same page in terms of action taken during the crisis and any decision to split from that way of working would have major political and social ramifications.